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Aviation News Aeronautical Engineers' B737-800SF programme picks up its FAA certification

Aeronautical Engineers' B737-800SF programme picks up its FAA certification

Romain Guillot
28 FEB 2019 | 331 words
Aeronautical Engineers' B737-800SF programme picks up its FAA certification
AEI
The programmes to convert Boeing 737NGs into cargo aircraft are continuing apace. After Bedek (737-700BDSF) and Boeing (737-800BCF) and while PEMCO has just announced a new Boeing 737-700 conversion programme, the American company Aeronautical Engineers Inc. (AEI) has just been issued the STC (Supplemental Type Certificate) for its B737-800SF programme by the FAA.

A first prototype (MSN 29121 - ex Air Berlin and Corendon Air) had been modified in December, but the issue of the STC had been delayed, a consequence of the partial American administration shutdown which lasted 35 days. This plane is part of the GECAS portfolio, which is planning to roll out 55 cargo 737-800s (most from AEI and Boeing conversion programmes) over the next few years.

AEI feels that the B737-800SF is the direct successor to its B737-400SF programme, an aircraft for which "there is still significant demand". The success of its new 737-800SF cannot be denied either, with contracts already signed for 111 aircraft (firm orders and commitments) even before the first one is delivered. The American company thinks that the market will need 750 Boeing 737-800s converted into full-freighters over the next forty years, with over 400 from its own modification centres.

The B737-800SF features the installation of a loading door (86" x 137"), the reinforcement of the floor structure and the modification of the main deck into a class E cargo compartment, the installation of a rigid 9g barrier, the replacement of the windows by aluminium plugs and the possibility of adding five seats at the front of the cabin for people accompanying the cargo.

The plane therefore has 11 full height 88" x 125" container positions, plus an additional position for an AEP/AEH at the rear. Each pallet may weigh up to 9000 pounds (4082 kg) with a plane which can carry loads up to 52,700 lbs (23.90 t) on its main deck, depending on the plane's initial characteristics (sub-series, maximum weights, etc.).
Romain Guillot
Chief editor
Cofounder of Journal de l'Aviation and Alertavia


 
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